Ingenium Acquires De Havilland Buffalo CC-115

The Buffalo CC-115 tail number 452 at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum.
Photo Credit: CNW Group/Ingenium

In a new development for Canada’s Museums of Science and Innovation, the de Havilland Canada Buffalo CC-115 with tail number 452 has found its new home at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum.

This historically significant aircraft, acquired from the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF), will be part of Ingenium’s extensive aviation collection and displayed in the Reserve Hangar.

CC-115 – Canadian Aviation History


The Buffalo, symbolic of technological advancements and de Havilland Canada’s legacy in designing short takeoff and landing airplanes for Canada’s challenging climate, holds a special place in aviation history.

Procured by the RCAF between June 1967 and December 1968, the CC-115 Buffalo played a crucial role in medium tactical transportation and later in search and rescue services.

“Notably, this aircraft was part of The SWINTER (The Servicewomen in Non-Traditional Environments and Roles) Aircrew Trials conducted between 1979 and 1985.”

“This marked the first time women were permitted to serve as pilots, navigators, and flight engineers in the Canadian Armed Forces,” said Chris Kitzan, Director General, Canada Aviation and Space Museum.

Etihad affiliate link banner

He went on to say, “The CC-115 Buffalo is a key addition to our RCAF and de Havilland collections. It will help us share stories of the evolution of the RCAF and its workforce, as well as about de Havilland’s role as a driver of innovation in Canada. Its display in our reserve hangar is sure to be a highlight.”

Operational History


The Buffalo has a significant operational history operating United Missions in the Middle East and Africa, as well as search and rescue operations. It made its last operational flight on January 15, 2022.

“The CC-115 Buffalo is a key addition to our RCAF and de Havilland collections. It will help us share stories of the evolution of the RCAF and its workforce, as well as about de Havilland’s role as a driver of innovation in Canada. Its display in our reserve hangar is sure to be a highlight,” added Chris Kitzan.

Photo Credit: John Davies – CYOW Airport Watch (GFDL 1.2 or GFDL 1.2), via Wikimedia Commons

The aircraft, flown from Comox, BC, to Trenton Ontario, underwent disassembly by the Department of National Defence (DND) before being transported to the Canada Aviation and Space Museum in Ottawa on six flatbed trucks in October.

The DND then skillfully reassembled the Buffalo, showcasing meticulous attention to detail. Visitors to the museum will have the opportunity to view the Buffalo during tours of the Reserve Hangar, which hosts several of Canada’s national aviation icons not currently displayed on the museum floor.

“At Ingenium, we take great pride in providing a home for outstanding pieces of heritage that push the dialogue on Canadian innovation.”

Welcoming the CC-115 Buffalo


“We are thrilled to add the de Havilland Buffalo CC-115 to our national collection of science and innovation,” said Christina Tessier, CEO and President, Ingenium – Canada’s Museums of Science and Innovation.

“The artifacts in our care tell amazing stories of innovation, and we are grateful for the opportunity to preserve this aircraft that represents significant technological and cultural developments in Canada.”

The official welcome ceremony for the Buffalo took place at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum on November 28, 2023, with representatives from Ingenium and the Department of National Defence in attendance.

“Ingenium’s acquisition of the de Havilland Buffalo CC-115 marks a pivotal moment in the narrative of Canadian aviation and ‘Your Air Force.'”

“This historic aircraft, used in groundbreaking trials and pivotal missions, now joins the annals of our aviation heritage,” said Lieutenant-General Eric Kenny, Commander of the Royal Canadian Air Force. “Together, we honour the RCAF’s centennial, paying tribute to our past and looking ahead to our future.”

The addition of the de Havilland Buffalo CC-115 to Ingenium’s collection not only preserves a vital piece of Canadian aviation history but also provides a platform to educate and inspire audiences about the country’s rich aerospace heritage.

As this iconic aircraft takes its place in the Reserve Hangar, it contributes to the ongoing narrative of innovation and achievement in Canada’s aviation landscape.

Did you know AviationSource has two newsletters? One covers the general news and analysis of the industry as a whole, and the other to do with emergencies that take place throughout the year! To subscribe to our General News Newsletter, CLICK HERE!
To subscribe to our Emergencies, Accidents & Incidents Newsletter, CLICK HERE!

Click the photo to join our WhatsApp channel so then you can stay up to date with everything going on in the aviation industry!

TAGGED:

King Abdulaziz International Airport receives first flight from Turkmenistan

Saudi Arabia's King Abdulaziz Airport has seen the first commercial flight arrive from Turkmenistan, opening avenues of economic and cultural

Len Varley By Len Varley

London Gatwick: New Chinese Services

London Gatwick (LGW) has announced that this coming summer season, the airport will have new Chinese services. This article will

Jamie Clarke By Jamie Clarke

Ryanair moves aircraft and staff in response to Dublin Airport traffic cap

Ryanair will redirect three aircraft, 16 routes, and relocate over 200 jobs to Southern Italy due to the restrictions imposed

Len Varley By Len Varley

Biden administration releases nearly $1B in grants for US airport improvements

An investment of $970 million from President Biden’s Bipartisan Investing in America agenda will be allocated to US airport upgrades

Len Varley By Len Varley
De Havilland Buffalo CC-115 with tail number 452 has found its new home at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum.
You Might Also Enjoy