The Editor’s Corner #6: Qantas’ Plans For The Future Will Turn Around Negative Times

LONDON – Qantas’ plans for the future will turn around the negative times it has been having with customer service and more. Welcome to the latest edition of The Editor’s Corner.

The Editor’s Corner is going to be an op-ed series from AviationSource Editor-in-Chief James Field, who is going to give his thoughts (Maybe controversial) on all things going on in the aviation industry.

In case you have missed the last five, feel free to browse through them before you continue to read this piece:

  1. The Editor’s Corner #1: The Industry Isn’t Ready for Summer 2022 Demand
  2. The Editor’s Corner #2: JetBlue’s Offer for Spirit Airlines Will Change The American Airline Dynamic
  3. The Editor’s Corner #3: Boris Johnson’s Damage To The Aviation Sector is Another Reason for Resignation
  4. The Editor’s Corner #4: PLAY Will Transform The Market with a Post-Pandemic Edge
  5. The Editor’s Corner #5: Detriment of the Boeing 737 MAX & 787 Is Causing a 777X-Based Aftershock

James will be starting things off with his next topic being: Qantas’ Plans For The Future Will Turn Around Negative Times

Qantas’ Plans For The Future Will Turn Around Negative Times


The latest news from Qantas this week regarding its blockbuster order of new aircraft as well as plans to operate the world’s longest route has given the carrier some good public relations.

From an exclusive look into their deplorable customer service to engineers being partly to blame for aircraft incidents, these new plans reflect keeping these problems in their rearview mirror.

How they will utilize these plans will make the way for a high level of potential success, and that is what the airline needs right now.

Order for New Aircraft Will Open Up New Revenue Streams…

The new aircraft that will join the Qantas fleet is going to open up new revenue streams into many different markets that Qantas typically wouldn’t touch.

The A321XLRs that are on order will no doubt encourage Qantas to operate flights into secondary airports with a high tourism output, which is more revenue there.

The A220s can work well for them on the short and maybe on the medium-haul network as well. Such versatility within this aircraft type offers other options for them as well.

Finally, with the A350-1000ULR too, opening up incredibly long and direct flights from Australia is being seen as a considerable talking point in connection points for customers too. But we will go more into that later.

Still Battling With Delays…

In the short term, the airline is still battling with delays, most notably on the carrier’s recent announcement last month that flights to Tokyo have been delayed until September.

The airline is also dealing with delays on the customer care phone lines, to which the airline had to release an official statement earlier in April.

Such delays are going to be what Qantas is known for in the short term before any such healing can occur in the long term. Qantas just has to sit back and ensure survivability on this front.

However, the airline is doing all it can, particularly in the front of expanding elsewhere, with direct flights focusing on India & South Korea respectively.

But for now, Qantas is right to focus on the future, as it’s clear that the damage from the short-term is irreversible at this time.

Project Sunrise Will Be Key To Carrier’s Healing…

Now that the plans for Project Sunrise are more or less finalized, this is going to be a big part of the carrier’s healing.

Direct flights from Sydney to London are going to make the likes of Emirates, British Airways, and others who transit via the Middle East and Asia, sweat.

Qantas has a massive opportunity here to undercut competitors and offer competitive fares, with the A350-1000ULR’s efficiency set to encourage that.

The Australian carrier does have to be careful, however. With deliveries and route launch not happening until the middle of the decade, this does give competitors the opportunity to expand and keep fares low.

For example, back in March, British Airways restarted services in Sydney, with a stop in Singapore on the way to the destination.

There is also no doubt that Emirates, Qatar Airways, and others will increase frequencies if the route proves to be high in demand.

However, passengers may very well opt for a direct flight to London and just bite the bullet of being in the air for that long.

The Manchester United Effect…

With that in mind, I kind of like to think of Qantas being in the same situation as Manchester United.

CEO Joyce has done a sterling job during his tenure, and has a lot to be credited for.

Manchester United is in turmoil at the moment but has the potential to succeed again. Now I am not saying that Qantas CEO Joyce should resign his post, but I am thinking of it from a bit more of a narrower viewpoint.

Strategies surrounding PR-based recovery need to be made, which Qantas has done with the fleet and route announcements for the middle of the decade.

Just like with Manchester United, Qantas will get back to the position it was once in, where success was the mantra and easy foundation of the business.

I, myself, have high hopes that despite the coverage that we have given the airline on AviationSource, the airline has the potential to do extremely well this decade, especially as we get further and further out of the pandemic.

Overall: Qantas Will Get There – It’s Only A Matter of Time…

With that in mind, it is only a matter of time before Qantas gets back to where they need to be.

Project Sunrise is going to do that for them, as it is going to break boundaries that have already been hit much further.

The airline is going to expose itself to new markets it wouldn’t have gone to previously, and this will be a key foundation in laying the groundwork for success.

I sincerely hope that Qantas get back to where they are, and I believe that they will do. It’s only a matter of time.

About the author

James Field

James is a passionate AvGeek based in Manchester, U.K who has been actively spotting for years. James is the Editor-in-Chief for the company.

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