Catering to the Narrowbody: JetBlue To Change The Way Passengers Fly Transatlantic

Adam Moreira (AEMoreira042281), CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

LONDON – JetBlue has today laid out another foundation in its strategy towards its plans for transatlantic operations.

This move is most likely to have come from the critique around not wanting to fly narrow-body aircraft for several hours across the Atlantic.

So the airline has come up with a solution instead.

JetBlue’s Airbus A321LR aircraft will use the AIRSPACE cabin provided by the European manufacturer to provide more comfort when flying onboard as well as offering significant legroom and plenty of personal space in its core economy product.

The airline is also going a step further. Anyone on the aircraft will be able to access high-speed wi-fi internet connection at no additional cost to when they board. It doesn’t matter what class you are in.

Adam Moreira (AEMoreira042281), CC BY-SA 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Another interesting feature comes from the Build-Your-Own Meal model implemented by company Dig who are aiming to access as many customer preferences as can be achieved onboard.

Discussing a bit more about these major features is Jayne O’Brien, head of marketing and loyalty at JetBlue who expressed great excitement over this project:

“From generous personal space, to our innovative build-your-own dining concept, every detail has been thoughtfully designed and will be made even better with the attentive service standards that a single-aisle aircraft allows. We know all too well the pain points of international flying – the dreaded center section, the ‘choice’ of assembly-line chicken or beef, and the lack of connectivity. JetBlue is ready to change all that with our take on transatlantic travel where you are well taken care of and fully connected if you want to be.

Jayne O’Brien, Head of Marketing and Loyalty, JetBlue

The Core product will offer 114 seats in total, with an expanded width of 18.4 inches, which is wider than any other wide-body aircraft that currently flies across the pond.

Adam Moreira (AEMoreira042281), CC BY-SA 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

There will be four rows for its Even More Space product, offering an additional six inches in legroom.

The in-flight entertainment screens will be a nicely-sized 10.1 inches and will offer 1080p HD viewing for all fliers onboard the aircraft in the future.

It remains clear that the several things stated in this article shows something very interesting. JetBlue is going to disrupt this market because it is not so much thinking about getting people on seats, but is more thinking about how transatlantic travel can be transformed for the better.

It will be interesting to see whether these flights will sell out quickly and whether the offerings it has produced will reflect on its popularity going forward.

About the author

James Field

James is a passionate AvGeek based in Manchester, U.K who has been actively spotting for years. James is the Editor-in-Chief for the company.

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